ritual robes, ceremonial robes, witches robes

Easy To Make Ceremonial Garments

Any witch can make the simplest ritual gowns with a minimum of basic sewing experience. Simply measure yourself from the top of your shoulder to the floor. Double this number and add two inches, this is the amount of cloth you need. For a gown which will really flow with your movements go for a 45″ nap, or for “full figured” witches, a 6O” nap works well.

Fold the material in half, and begin to stitch the sides from bottom toward the top. To avoid trailing ends which can trip you during ceremonies, you may want to cut a swooping taper into the bottom edges from the outside edge. Leave the sides slit for about six or so inches to allow for ease of movement. It will also show a bit of calf and allow for air flow under the gown to keep you cool, if needed. Also, be certain to leave several inches open at the top for your arms to fit through.

When you finish the sides, as you decide best suits you, cut a hole for your head, start fairly small, a tight fit can always be adjusted, a loose one cannot. One you have the initial hole cut for the head, you can slip it on and measure how much more, if any, trimming you want to do. You can also choose to give a v-shape to the side you choose as the front neck opening, if you wish.

Once you have the neckline chosen, you can turn the material under and stitch a small hem into it. Afterward, you hem the bottom of the gown, side slits if you opt for them, and you are finished.

If you are comfortable enough to show some leg, or it is hot in your area, you may want to make the gown much shorter. (Measure from the top of the shoulders to the point you want the gown to reach and add two inches, allowing for the hem.)

If you want it to look more “fitted”, you may choose to go for a smaller nap, add darts to your stitching or belt it with a simple metal chain, colored ribbon, or belt, at the waist.

Personally, I recommend you only use natural fibers as they are more appropriate, breathable and more comfortable in most climates. We use a nice thin linen in our area for the summer months and a nice thick cotton jersey material for the thicker winter robes. Even in Texas, winters become chilly and the phrase cold as a witches… well you know, is better as a saying than as a reality!

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