By Malcolm Lidbury (aka Pink pasty) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Recipes: Goofer Dust

When talking to some witches, you may hear them refer to Goofer Dust or to Goofering a person. These terms come from the Hoodoo practices of the Southern United States. The traditions behind Goofering are believed to have come from Africa when the slaves brought their traditional religions with them after being stolen from their homes in centuries past and relocated to the Southern states. Some witches you meet will try to say that Goofer Dust is the same as Graveyard Dirt, however, this is false. Yes, Goofer Dust starts with a base of Graveyard Dirt, to be sure, but it also has other ingredients added which determine how it is to be used. It is the additions of these other ingredients and the intent poured into the concoction while it is created that converts Graveyard Dirt to Goofer Dust. Just as adding intent and salt to a jar of collected water changes the plain water to Holy Water.

Goofer Dust is a handy tool for some witches. It is often found in occult stores or online in pre-packaged bottles or packets. The only problem is that many of the types of so-called Goofer Dusts sold online are not true Goofer Dusts. They are commercially created fakes, which are passed off to unknowing buyers as the real thing, when they are anything but the real thing. Some people and groups sell a variety of crushed herbs, others use herbs mixed with colored sawdust, while some others are selling tinted talcum powders and claiming that they have magickal properties. Liars abound where money is concerned.

True Goofer Dust is best made by the witch who plans to use it. It may also be purchased from someone the witch knows that they can trust to be honest about the ingredients. This is necessary, in order to insure it is the real thing and as potent as necessary for the types of controlling and/or baneful magick the concoction is used for in spells.

Classic Goofer Dust Recipe:

  • Graveyard Dirt
  • Sulfur
  • Dried and ground venomous snake skin

Possible Herbal Additions:

  • Echinops for crossing and hexing enemies
  • Hemlock for paralyzing negative situations
  • Hydrangea for binding enemies
  • Knotweed for Binding and controlling the magick of others and cursing enemies
  • Morning Glory for binding enemies
  • Nettle for returning a hex to another
  • Paprika for crossing an enemy
  • Solomon’s Seal Root for binding the magick and spell work of others
  • Wormwood for crossing and hexing enemies
  • Yerba Mate for ending relationships

I would suggest that if you are going to create your own Goofer Dust, that you ensure that you know enough about venomous snakes and their shed skins, to recognize the real thing when it is offered to you. Remember, many snakes, which are not venomous, have evolved to look very similar to ones that are for their own protection in nature against predators. If you cannot trust yourself to recognize the difference, then by all means, use a trusted source, as this is a crucial ingredient in the base of the Goofer Dust recipe.

Once you have all the ingredients, you need to grind them together and store them in an airtight container, a small glass jar would be best. Mark it clearly as Goofer Dust. Just as with War Water and a few other dangerous items, Goofer Dust is one of those magickal items that you certainly do not want to use in error!

Be certain to cleanse the work area thoroughly after creating the Goofer Dust. Clean any tools used, the altar and/or preparation areas, even the outside of the container to make certain it is all contained where it should be for your own safety.

Some witches will choose never to use Goofer Dust out of fear, but for those who do choose to use it, it is a powerful tool and handy to have around.

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One thought on “Recipes: Goofer Dust

  1. Pingback: Witchery: Graveyard Dirt | Sacred Hands Coven

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